Local architects honoured at NSW and Newcastle Awards

The Verve complex in Newcastle. Similar design elements will be used on Central Coast projects

Leading Central Coast-based architect firm, CKDS, and its collaborators, Hill Thalis Architecture and Urban Projects, have collected a raft of honours at this year’s NSW Architecture Awards and the Newcastle Architecture Awards for their design of Verve Residences at Newcastle.

And CKDS is bringing the elements of design which led to the awards to its ongoing projects on the Central Coast, director Cain King said.

The firm’s work on the residential and commercial development took out the Aaron Bolot Award for Residential Architecture – Multiple Housing, as well as the Blacket Prize for design excellence in a regional context at the NSW Architecture Awards.

At the Newcastle Awards, CKDS took home the prestigious Architecture Medal, the award for Residential Architecture – Houses (Multiple Housing) and a commendation for Sustainable Architecture.

King said the firm’s Central Coast developments also incorporated a holistic balance between innovative design and sustainability.

“We regard sustainability highly when we design and these principles are within every project we do,” King said.

“Even my own home nearing completion will be an off the grid, sustainable home.

“Sustainability is very important – we have to make sure everything we do is done in its most efficient form.

“We look at such things as orientation, ventilation – we open the design up where we can and look at how heating and cooling can be achieved efficiently.

“We look at hydronic heating, solar, battery supplies to the main wattage.

“Good design sells and doesn’t have to cost very much.”

King said the firm often operated under joint ventures.

“We do joint ventures as much as we can; sometimes you don’t think of everything and collaboration can be a good thing,” he said.

“Also, we don’t want all the architecture to be the same; it’s important for urban context to have versatility.”

King said community connectivity and recognition of history and place was important in all of the firm’s projects.

Terry Collins

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